My take on Henry’s Baby Blanket!

I really love how this blanket came out so I thought I would share yarns and alterations with you in case you want to make one of your own. 

My colleague at work is having a baby in September and I wanted to make her a blanket. I knew it had to be a modern look so after a bit of searching I found Henry’s Baby Blanket by talented Rebecca on Little Monkey’s Crochet.

If you are eager and ready to go, scroll down to find instructions but I need to blab a bit before I get to that part 🙂

The pattern is well written and there are no complicated stitches so this is a great project for a beginner. Just make sure you have the skill level to make your stitches even and nice as there is no edge to hide mistakes on long sides 🙂

This blanket has wide color blocks in 2 different techniques, herringbone crochet and sc, hdc.

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Here is a close up of herringbone

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And here is one of the sc, hdc

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I love the modern look of this blanket! This is the first blanket without traditional edging I have made so I was a bit worried the edges would be wonky but it worked out fine!

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I decided to go with my favorite yarn, Drops Muskat, which is a bit thicker than the yarn suggested in the pattern. My colleague got to choose colors as she is the one who needs to like the blanket.

Drops Muskat is pure cotton and has a lovely sheen to it. It does tend to split a bit, but not to the extent it is annoying. It creates perfect stitch definition which is essential for this design. You can see the stitch definition in the close up pics above.

For a baby blanket I want something durable that holds up for lots of washing and Drops Muskat can be machine washed. As I wasn’t sure if the colors would bleed in higher temperatures I crocheted a swatch and was even able to wash it in 90 degrees Celsius without the colors bleeding.

The original pattern only contains 6 color blocks and I wanted 7 so I could have 3 in main color. I made swatches to determine how many stitches would be needed to get a blanket the size I wanted but was not sure how well it would work until the blanket was finished.

My blanket turned out to be 70 X 120 cm, slightly larger than a traditional baby blanket but I figure it just means one can use it longer. It is also the perfect size for mother and baby to snuggle under during feeding time cold winter days 🙂

Making the swatches I realized I needed to go up one hook size for the blocks of sc, hdc. I also had to make in total 20 rows of sc, hdc for each block instead of the 18 rows stated in pattern to get equal height as for the  fish bone panels.

So I urge you to swatch and determine what hooks and how many rows you need for your blanket.

I really love the different textures of the blocks and how they are divided by the contrast color!

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My take on Henry’s Baby Blanket

Final measurements approximately 70 X 120 cm. (Do keep in mind this could differ due to personal tension)

You need

Pattern for Henry’s Baby Blanket

Hooks

Number 5

Number 5,5

Yarn

Color A: 3 balls Drops Muskat no 08 Off White

Color B: 6 balls Drops Muskat no 30 Vanilla Yellow

Color C: 4 balls of Drops Muskat no 61 Light Beige

Color D: 4 balls of Drops Muskat no 24 Taupe

Alterations to original pattern

Section 1, Top ribbing

Hook no 5

To get a slightly wider ribbing I started with chaining 11 instead of suggested 9. This gave a ribbing of 10 stitches instead of suggested 8.

Section 2, body of blanket

My color way

Block 1 Yellow

Block 2 Light beige

Block 3 Taupe

Block 4 Yellow

Block 5 Light Beige

Block 6 Taupe

Block 7 Yellow

Row 23: Switch to hook no 5,5. Extend sc, hdc row to a total of 20 rows instead of suggested 18 (row 23-42 instead of suggested 23-40) Do this for every block of sc, hdc in rest of pattern.

Row 43: Switch back to hook no 5.

Now follow original design but add panel 7 in herringbone before heading on to bottom ribbing

Section 3, Bottom Ribbing

Again, chain 11 instead of suggested 9. Follow pattern but with ribbing 10 stitches wide instead of suggested 8.

Weave in ends. Done!

 

 

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